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Taxwriting Committees Announce New Members as Tax Reform Discussions Continue

first_imgCCH Tax Day ReportThe taxwriting committees of the 115th Congress are taking shape as both parties fill their respective vacancies. Republican and Democratic lawmakers have filled vacant taxwriter seats on the House Ways and Means and Senate Finance Committees.Ways and MeansThe Ways and Means Committee, chaired by Kevin Brady, R-Tex., will add three new Republican members. The lawmakers joining are Reps. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., Jackie Walorski, R-Ind., and Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla. Each new member was recommended by the House Republican Steering Committee. The committee is responsible for recommending Republican lawmakers to serve on standing committees in the House.“They are joining our team at a historic moment as we move forward on pro-growth tax reform,” Brady said in a statement. According to Brady, all three lawmakers have the “perfect mix” of policy and real-world expertise to assist in the forthcoming tax code overhaul.A fourth GOP seat could be filled as Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., is expected to leave the committee. Price has been chosen by President-elect Trump to be secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services.Ways and Means’ new ranking member, Richard Neal, D-Mass., (TAXDAY, 2016/12/02, C.1) announced the addition of three Democrats to the committee. The lawmakers joining are Reps. Brian Higgins, D-N.Y., Terri Sewell, D-Ala., and Suzan DelBene, D-Wash. Each was recommended by the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee to fill the open seats.“This is a crucial time for our committee’s Democratic members, as we will be leading the fight in Congress to stand up for working families, develop tax policies that are fair for all Americans and small businesses and promote economic growth….” Neal said in a statement.Additionally, Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Ill., will become chairman of the Ways and Means Tax Policy Subcommittee. Roskam is replacing Rep. Charles W. Boustany, R-La., who left the House in an unsuccessful run for the Senate.Senate Finance CommitteeThe Senate Finance Committee (SFC) will retain its leadership under Chairman Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, and ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore. The SFC has one new member: Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La. (TAXDAY, 2017/01/04, C.1).“I am confident that we’ll be able to continue our record of bipartisanship with our colleagues on the other side of the aisle to help meet the demands before us and produce real results for the American people,” Hatch said in a statement. According to SFC member Benjamin L. Cardin’s, D-Md., social media page, the 115th Congress presents a “new opportunity to create a more perfect union.”By Jessica Jeane, Wolters Kluwer News Stafflast_img read more

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Certain Restructuring of Exempt Organizations Will No Longer Require New Status Applications (Rev. Proc. 2018-15)

first_imgLogin to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative. The IRS has provided guidance that will allow domestic organizations exempt under Code Sec. 501(c) to change their form or state of organization without reapplying for exempt status. Eight examples are provided for added clarity.Material Change of FactsRev. Proc. 2018-5 describes the requirements for obtaining an exempt status determination. In Section 11.02 states that an exempt status determination may no longer be relied upon if there is a material change of facts, inconsistent with exemption, in the character, purpose, or method of operation of the organization. Also, significant changes to programs, services, or the organizational documents are required to be reported on organizations’ Forms 990.Exempt ReorganizationsEffective January 1, 2018, the restructuring of a domestic entity that is:classified as a corporation under Reg. §301.7701-2(b)(1) or (2); andrecognized as exempt under Code Sec. 501(a) as an organization described in Code Sec. 501(c),will not be required to file a new application for exemption from tax for the surviving organization if the surviving entity is carrying out the same purposes as the exempt organization had been before the restructuring.In addition, the organization must be in good standing with the state in which it is incorporated or formed (if an unincorporated association). Moreover it must continue to satisfy the organizational test described in Reg. §1.501(c)(3)-1(b).This updated procedures does not apply to  corporate restructurings in which the resulting organization is a:disregarded entity,limited liability company,partnership,foreign business entity,or when the surviving entity obtains a new employer identification number.Any such surviving entity that desires exempt status under Code Sec. 501(a) must apply following the procedures detailed in Rev. Proc. 2018-5.Rev. Rul. 67-390 and Rev. Rul. 77-469 are obsoleted.Rev. Proc. 2018-15last_img read more

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On The Reel: Video – DJ Sat-One

first_img We asked DJ Jazzy Jeff who he was paying attention to in Philly’s DJ scene. One of the DJs he named is DJ Sat-One. DJ Jazzy Jeff’s former production company A Touch of Jazz is actually where Sat-One got his start. Since then, he’s gone on to be widely sought after DJ. We met up with the Philly native in Rittenhouse Square to get to know him a little bit better. Watch DJ Sat-One in the video below. DJ Sat-One(D. King for GPTMC)last_img

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Must-Hit: Music Makes Me Happy Takes Over Voltage Lounge With An Artists Showcase Featuring Carvin & Ivan, John Graves, BriaMarie, Jacqueline Constance, Suzann Christine, Youssef Kromah

first_img Music Makes Me Happy is bringing their first artist showcase to Voltage Lounge in Philadelphia on Wednesday, July 22nd. A multiple city showcase, the Philly show is packed with the area’s best including John Graves, BriaMarie, Suzann Christine, and Youssef Kromah. The night is packed with exciting segments including an opening performance from Jacqueline Constance. GRAMMY-nominated producers Ivan Barias and Carvin Haggins will also be presented with the Music Makes Me Happy Community Award. Hosted by Joshua Nelson this night will be full of great music and it’s all for a great cause. The proceeds from the event will help fund Music Makes Me Happy education initiatives in Philadelphia, Atlanta and Los Angeles. Music Makes Me Happy is the brainchild of Joshua Dingle. Between apparel, networking events, and musical performances, Music Makes Me Happy creates community among people with one common love, music. Their support for the arts is creating a movement. Artists like Jazmine Sullivan, Da Truth, Lecrae and more have been spotted rocking their apparel. Come out to support not only great artists from Philadelphia that will sing your socks off, but also a great cause! Grab your tickets now, the first 50 RSVPs will get a special Music Makes Me Happy Gift Bag! Music Makes Me Happy Artist Showcase When: Wednesday, July 22, 7 p.m. Where: Voltage Lounge, 421 N 7th Street Cost: $15 in advance, $20 at the door More Info: Click here. Suzann Christine(Courtesy of the artists)last_img read more

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Tonight: Jacqueline Constance Headlines The Next Edition Of Sanctuary LIVE! – Friday, August 21

first_img Tonight, Art Sanctuary — Philly’s premier black arts hub — presents its monthly third Friday open mic and music showcase, Sanctuary LIVE! This edition of the monthly jam features an intimate night of music with Philly’s own indie soul-star, Jacqueline Constance. An emerging artists on the local music scene, Jacqueline Constance is Philly-born singer/songwriter who’s known for silky vocals, undeniable grooves and her penchant for creating dope beats with a loop pedal during her sets. Effortlessly blending hip-hop, soul and jazz influences into her sound, Constance is a unique and fresh addition to the Philadelphia musical landscape. Armed with a mic, foot pedal and a small mixer this Philadelphia-born powerhouse turns breaths, beats and other vocal elements into an intricate background track for her live performances. Born and raised in the Mt Airy section of Philadelphia, Jacqueline attended the legendary Creative and Performing Arts High School  which also brought us such artists as the Roots, Boyz II Men, Jazmine Sullivan, to name a few. Constance  has also performed at notable venues such as The Hard Rock Cafe, World Cafe Live and the Kimmel Center. Sanctuary LIVE! is hosted by Philly-based poet Safa and kicks off with an open mic from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The open mic segment is backed by rising Philly jazz vocalist and pianist, V. Shayne Frederick — a pitch perfect addition to any musical setting.  In addition to the lush vocals from the incredible lineup of musicians, attendees will get a chance to check out Art Sanctuary’s latest exhibit, My Son Matters, which includes over two dozen poignant photographs of black mothers and their sons.  Be sure to RSVP in advance, because you most definitely want to be front and center when these Philly talents step on stage. Wine and light fare included. Sanctuary LIVE! Featuring Jacqueline Constance When: Friday, August 21, Doors 7 p.m., Show 7:30 p.m. Where: Art Sanctuary, 16th and Bainbridge Cost: $10 More Info: RSVP here. Jacqueline Constance(Courtesy of the artist)last_img read more

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CPS updates sex education policy language

first_imgThe Columbia Public Schools board of education on Monday night talked sex education policy.Missouri lawmakers passed a bill last year requiring districts to teach students about sexual harassment, sexual violence, and consent during sex education. The district was already doing that, but the board had to agree to change some policy language to fit what the state wanted.Parents can still opt out their kids from the sex education.last_img

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(AUDIO) Barbara Buffaloe on Columbia recycling, climate plan

first_imgColumbia Sustainability Manager Barbara Buffaloe explains where your recycling goes after you drop it off at the curb. She also talked with Wake Up Columbia about the city’s new climate plan.last_img

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Ameren decides against wind farm in northwest Missouri

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Don’t miss RickE’s breakout session at Citrix Synergy!

first_imgKey engineering collaboration focus areas with Citrix for you to be aware of and track near term and beyond.How you can maximize performance and returns with Intel-based client and server technologies when using Citrix desktop and server virtualization technologies. Where: Moscone West Convention Center, San FranciscoWhen: May 13, 2010 / 3:00 pm – 3:50 pmRegistration: http://www.citrixsynergy.com/registration.html Rick Echevarria, VP of the Business Client Platform Division, is hosting a breakout session (SYN601) at Citrix Synergy next month.I hear a lot of planning chatter about demos and videos for this session coming out of the cube next to mine – this will be good!Session Description: This session will provide insight and guidance about achieving maximum performance, power efficiency, manageability and security with Intel-based server and client platforms hosting Citrix virtual computing software. In this session you will learn more about:last_img read more

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What Remote Configuration root certificate hashes are on my system?

first_imgHave you wondered what root certificate hashes are on a system, and wanted to validate without entering the MEBx?Try the ztclocalagent.exe utility with a -discovery option.   ZTClocalagent is available with the Intel AMT SDK – http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/download-the-latest-intel-amt-software-development-kit-sdk/.   Look in the subdirectory \Windows\Intel_Manageability_Configuration\Bin  (source code also available in the download)If you’ve decided to apply custom root hashes in your environment – this could help to quickly determine whether a custom hash is loaded.If you’re unsure whether the latest VeriSign, GoDaddy, or other root hash is on a platform – or the specific AMT version – this approach could help.   (for background data on the root certificate hashes – see http://communities.intel.com/community/openportit/vproexpert/blog/2010/02/12/verisign-provisioning-certs)Also – if you’re using the latest vPro Activator (version 5.1.x or higher), you will also see the root certificate hashesThere is an improved local AMT discovery capability coming – but if you need a solution today, try this outHere’s an example of the output as shown from one of my systems.   Note that all of the root certificate hashes are listed belowThe following was obtained by running ztclocalagent -discoveryYou will need to run with local administrator rights and the HECI driver must be loaded for this to work.   I’ve seen situations with Win7 64-bit where a command prompt must be opened with “run as administrator” for this to work.******************************Intel ZTCLocalAgent Version: 3.0.0.1 Setup and Configuration:Not startedFound 8 certificate hashes in following Handles:0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,Certificate hash entry:Friendly Name = VeriSign Class 3 Primary CA-G1Default = trueActive = trueHash Algorithm = SHA1Certificate Hash:74 2C 31 92 E607 E4 24 EB 4549 54 2B E1 BBC5 3E 61 74 E2Certificate hash entry:Friendly Name = VeriSign Class 3 Primary CA-G3Default = trueActive = trueHash Algorithm = SHA1Certificate Hash:13 2D 0D 45 534B 69 97 CD B2D5 C3 39 E2 5576 60 9B 5C C6Certificate hash entry:Friendly Name = Go Daddy Class 2 CADefault = trueActive = trueHash Algorithm = SHA1Certificate Hash:27 96 BA E6 3F18 01 E2 77 261B A0 D7 77 7002 8F 20 EE E4Certificate hash entry:Friendly Name = Comodo AAA CADefault = trueActive = trueHash Algorithm = SHA1Certificate Hash:D1 EB 23 A4 6D17 D6 8F D9 2564 C2 F1 F1 6017 64 D8 E3 49Certificate hash entry:Friendly Name = Starfield Class 2 CADefault = trueActive = trueHash Algorithm = SHA1Certificate Hash:AD 7E 1C 28 B064 EF 8F 60 0340 20 14 C3 D0E3 37 0E B5 8ACertificate hash entry:Friendly Name = VeriSign Class 3 Primary CA-G2Default = trueActive = trueHash Algorithm = SHA1Certificate Hash:85 37 1C A6 E550 14 3D CE 2803 47 1B DE 3A09 E8 F8 77 0FCertificate hash entry:Friendly Name = VeriSign Class 3 Primary CA-G1.5Default = trueActive = trueHash Algorithm = SHA1Certificate Hash:A1 DB 63 93 916F 17 E4 18 5509 40 04 15 C702 40 B0 AE 6BCertificate hash entry:Friendly Name = VeriSign Class 3 Primary CA-G5Default = trueActive = trueHash Algorithm = SHA1Certificate Hash:4E B6 D5 78 499B 1C CF 5F 581E AD 56 BE 3D9B 67 44 A5 E5 BIOS Version:            6IET57H1 (1.17 )center_img Intel AMT code versions:        Flash:                                            6.1.0        Netstack:                                     6.1.0        AMTApps:                                   6.1.0        AMT:                                             6.1.0        Sku:                                               24584        VendorID:                                   8086        Build Number:                           1042        Recovery Version:                   6.1.0        Recovery Build Num:              1042        Legacy Mode:                            Falselast_img read more

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Military job transitioning, 18 years later

first_imgThere will be plenty of situations that you find yourself in where you become frustrated. Keep your skills relevant Instead go straight to the person and try and fix it together. If there is no owner; then you own it until solved. To all my fellow veterans, I wish you the very best in everything you do. Regardless of where you find yourself, put your happiness first and the rest will follow. Fair winds and following seas, unless you live under the water, then it would be run silent, run deep! A special thanks to my shipmate Bill Giraud, who provided me with the photos I used above. There is no faster way to solve a problem in the military than jumping up the chain of command. Everyone respects it and everyone reports to it. Try doing that in the civilian world and see how fast you are marked as someone who refuses to address problems directly and collaborate towards a solution. Talk to people and volunteer to help solve problems. While doing that, notice who they go to when they have issues and who the experts are. Quietly (or publicly) add those people to your network and start having 1:1 meetings with them. Overtime, you will build a network of loosely connected people who can help you solve any problem you encounter. You will also be seen as an enabler and someone willing to jump in and get your hands dirty. Yes I know how to program in FORTRAN, however, the value of that in today’s computing environment is relatively zero. Take a class and learn something like JavaScript or C# instead. Dress the part When I was an instructor at nuclear prototype training, one of my favorite questions I would ask is what “CRUD” stood for, if the interviewee used it in a sentence (ask me later and I’ll tell you, it’s a nuc thing). As an example, during my first year I found myself taking log readings (on some equipment) one night, and noticed that someone left a valve open. After asking around no one on the prior shift (who should have noticed) found it or owned up to opening it. This also means don’t volunteer information that is not relevant or that you don’t want the interviewer to try and get you to elaborate on. Build a professional network Collaborate, don’t jump up the chain of command On a submarine, this type of behavior was not tolerated as it could kill the crew; this may not be the case at a civilian job, so take it in context with the new job and react accordingly. Talk to your mentor and don’t over react. The chain of command should not be the first place you jump to.center_img If not after the military, then put it in your 5 year plan. Isn’t that why you signed up for the GI Bill in the first place? Which means, don’t talk about what you don’t know. If you are going to cover a specific process, ensure you know the lingo. Talking acronyms could backfire if the interviewer asks you what that means. Don’t talk above your pay grade When you’re in the military, there are many things that identify who and what you are. These vary from rank and rate, to insignia and duty station. This is not much different than life in the civilian world where your personal self is defined by the community in which you live, the school you attend and your job where you work. There are few similarities between what I did in the military and what I do at Intel; assuming we don’t consider talking in acronyms.I’m a bubbleheadFor those of you who lack some basic understanding of military terms, let me rephrase that; I am a submariner! This means I earned my dolphins while serving on the USS Bluefish (SSN-675), as part of my enlisted service in the US Navy. When serving on a surface or submarine command, you are required to go through your  on-board quals (qualifications) as necessary to gain a detailed understanding of every system on the submarine. From the torpedoes, to the diesel generator, from the TDU (trash disposal unit) to the periscope, from the firefighting to basic nuclear engineering, you had to learn it all. You were given a written qual-card and expected to demonstrate hands-on, written and verbal learning in order to support your shipmate. Although difficult, I was happy to earn my dolphins within six months of stepping on-board.…and nuc LELTThis means I attended basic training for my rate as a Machinist Mate, and then more detailed training at the Navy Nuclear Power School, rapidly followed by six months operating nuclear reactors to qualify enough to deploy to a submarine. We were warned that there was a high rate (>50% end-to-end) of drop from the program; and they  weren’t lying. I then took a two year job to teach other sailors how to do what I just learned, which delayed my deployment until the winter of 1989. After arriving on-board, I rapidly completed my nuclear qual-card in order to help in the operations of the nuclear engineering spaces (that which pushed the boar along). As an ELT (engineering laboratory technician), I had the added responsibility of working with a team to maintain the reactor and steam system chemistry. After about six months, I stepped into the leadership role of our division and became the Leading ELT (or LELT), inside a nuclear powered submarine. We were expected to learn fast, learn much and be professional in everything we did.I was 22 years old.Being a bubblehead nuc LELT is what defined who I was and how I approached my job. I trusted my team of shipmates and knew exactly what had to happen because it was documented in excruciating detail, and often checked by a second and third person. As a sub-qualified nuc , I knew I could rely on my shipmates for anything while deployed and they relied on me. If someone said they did it, you learned to rely on that word and moved along.Bittersweet departureAfter five years on the Bluefish, I decided to leave the Navy. I had forgotten what the real world was like. My jobs prior to the military were those typical for a teenager, and not typical of the corporate world. I had no need to truly rely on someone, nor was I put in charge of something that could cost millions of dollars if damaged.Early on, Intel recognized the value of military personnel and I attended a job fair hosted in Charleston South Carolina. It was during one of these interviews that I was asked to fly to Chandler and interview for a job on their newest high-capacity microchip factory. After I took the job I realized that some of my co-workers (translates from shipmate) were also ex-military and just as excited to be working at Intel. This was also my introduction to something called “Behavioral Interviewing,” which is a science all by itself.Corporate workFollowing my transition into civilian work, I found myself jumping into another transition for Intel, one bracketed by something called “Back to Basics.” You see, during the early 1990’s, Intel felt that they were shifting away from those values that made the company great. This was mostly caused by their rapid growth in employee numbers and geographical locations. To solve this they instituted mandatory training on corporate values, effective communications, dealing with difficult people and effective meetings (there may be more, however, this is what I remember). For me, this was great since my way of dealing with all of this was definitely different.Benjamin Franklin had it right when he said, “It is easier to prevent bad habits than to break them.” Lucky for me this training was early enough in my career that I still remember most of the key items and still refer to them today. Unfortunately the same training is not available for new hires, as they have reduced the mandatory training and altered some of the focus on teaching people some “core” skills, or expectations, early in their career. I would liken the “Back to Basics” initiative as a corporate boot camp in order to get everyone on the same page.Following my initial training, I moved into something called compressed work week (CWW), working front-end nights. This meant that I worked 12 hours a day, three (and then four) days a week. To someone in the military (especially a submariner), this was a cake walk. You mean I only had to work 12 hours a day, and then I got at least 3 days off? Of course, now that you aren’t deployed, there was more to do during the day and sleeping was one of those things that slid down the list; it took me some time to adapt to this style of work.Find the right jobA great thing about Intel is that they ask you to find another job inside the company if you are looking to find a new challenge; basically, move within not out. After about two years I decided to try and move from factory support (military training) into software development (hobby). This involved quite a bit of self-learning and 1:1 meetings with some developers I found who sat near me. After doing this for about 6 months and learning to develop on this (relatively) new platform called the web (on the Intranet), I was able to get a job and start doing what I truly loved. What followed has been 16 years of college, job changes and new technologies, driving me to where I am today.I love my job and the company I work for. Without the experience and learning’s I brought from the US Navy, I would not be where I am today.Planning for transitionThere is nothing I did that is outside the ordinary with one exception – I saw what I wanted to do and I planned. That planning included my understanding that I would have to move from nights (shift) to days, and then go back to college. That planning included a few job transitions and making some risky choices in my career (there weren’t many web developers in a company running off of mainframes).What can you do in order to help yourself along towards the right job in the civilian world?Have a great resume.Today this is a bit easier than it was in the pre-Internet world. You can look at examples, install software and templates, and even hire someone to do it and return a finished product — all without leaving your chair.You may need more than one “type” or copy of your resumeMake your job examples (duties) relevant to the job you are applying forEnsure you have data to back-up any claims Mentors can bridge the gap between expected response and the way you want to respond based on military training. Oftentimes we were trained to rapidly solve problems, and now we need to consider, collaborate and respond appropriately. Dealing with difficult people training came in handy my first few years, and now I lean on it as I mentor people. Get some schooling When you needed to find someone at your command to solve a problem, there was always someone who knew someone, which made it easy. You could also fall back on ratings to own specific things (Machinist Mates; they own the main engines) or departments (Engineering — reactor controls). For years I worked with a database engineer who wore a three piece suit to work. At Intel that is not the norm for casual business attire, and you should try and learn what the equivalent is before you do an interview. If all else fails simply ask your contact what the dress style is. Showing up in uniform (or the civilian equivalent) may be your natural tendency, however, it could be perceived incorrectly. By the way, I’m wearing a button-up short sleeve shirt, shorts and gym shoes as I type this. Find a mentor Act the part If you can operate a nuclear reactor, you can mention it but also tell them about your skills in some of the parallel technologies that the company implements in their business. If necessary, take a class and learn about some of the newer technologies that the military may be late to adopt. The use of slang, slurred speech (without reason) and overall looking like you are stretching for a job you don’t deserve or cannot handle, is not way to build confidence in the hiring team. Act as though you own the role, explain what you would do when you go there and how you’ll make it your own.last_img read more

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Big Data Doesn’t Seem So Big Anymore

first_imgBigMemory Max also safeguards data by copying it across multiple servers. Data loss won’t occur if one server fails because a complete copy of the data sits on another server. BigMax Memory can maintain an uptime of 99.999 percent with this data mirroring method.But wait—it gets even better. The Intel® Xeon™ processor E7 v2 family was engineered for systems that require an uptime of 99.999 percent. Combining BigMemory Max with servers built on the Intel® Xeon™ processor E7 v2 allows enterprises to follow the scale-up model, which helps reduce power use, cooling costs, and complexity.Servers running BigMemory Max and the Intel® Xeon™ processor E7 v2 family help decrease overall total cost of ownership (TCO) without sacrificing the benefits of a large cluster running on lower-powered servers. This allows enterprises to expand their big data horizons, changing impossible or improbable analyses into very manageable scenarios.Read more about Terracotta BigMemory Max and Intel at Terracotta Breaks Down Barriers to Big Data ManagementOpens in a new window .Follow me on Twitter, @TimIntel. Terracotta BigMemory Max, a recognized leader of in-memory data management solutions, is changing the way that enterprises analyze big data. How? By storing data in a server’s machine memory. This change makes big data analysis more reliable and much faster. On the traditional hard-disk-based data management model, analysis of big data could have taken hours or days to process, but BigMemory Max whittles that down to minutes or even seconds! Crucial business decisions can be made faster and more accurately when big data is processed in-memory.Watch a select video presentation on Terracotta BigMemory Max and Intel from the Strata Conferencelast_img read more

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Diversity of Innovation at OpenStack with an Open Source and an Open Mind

first_imgWhile at the 2016 OpenStack summit in Austin, TX, I came upon a creative artwork titled the Diversity of Innovation. Marveling at the colorful graphic, I was intrigued by its powerful message that gave me pause.  Open Source, by design is a fertile ground for innovation as an environment that continuously brings complementing perspectives to bear on forward thinking technological concepts.  But, as the graphic implies, add a healthy dose of diversity to it and magic happens – an ecosystem already primed for innovation is injected with the diversity of the practitioners with varying characteristics and backgrounds.  Diversity met Innovation in an environment of Open Source at the OpenStack Summit – a conference where Intel VP Imad Sousou punctuated his keynote with the phrase –Open Stack Open Source Open Mind !!Little did I know that I would really live the experience of SouSou’s message during the conference.  There were two distinct encounters with a couple of attendees at this summit that characterized this message culminating in the poster on display on the last day of the conference.  Diversity can be manifested through varied representation from different countries, cultures, professions and other demographics.  But, there are ways that we can be diverse ourselves as individuals — as my two open encounters reinforced at this conference.I attended a panel session on Open Stack in the Enterprise — Are we Doing Enough? This panel, moderated by one of the industry analysts had representation from multiple vendors as well as The OpenDaylight Project — represented by its Executive Director, Neela Jacques.Many of the thoughts that Neela shared about the need for an Open Platform in the Telco world during his panel session resonated with me.  Over lunch, Neela was very cogent and articulate in his passionate thoughts around Open Culture and Open Source making me wonder if this white Caucasian looking guy I just met was born with Open Source in his bloodstream.  I was almost right!Neela explained that he spent many years in an Ashram in India where he had seen his mother lead a group of volunteers who always came together to collaborate and do goodness.  People who did this driven by their passion took it upon themselves to drive the community forward.  Based upon their skills and abilities, some of them emerged as experts in different domains. Meritocracy. The environment Neela grew up in exuded a culture that was flat by nature where titles did not mean much.  Sound familiar?Hello Open Source !!No wonder Neela was able to articulate his thoughts around Open Source concepts so clearly.  And then, he said that he was originally from France.  Talk about diverse backgrounds !  Remember, the cup of innovation served with a shot of Open Culture at Costa Coffee in downtown Raleigh, NC?My encounter was with Nithya Ruff, Open Source Strategist at Sandisk.  Nithya shared her background from the state of Karnataka in India and various activities she is engaged with in the Silicon Valley for different causes.  Having exchanged some ideas with her on Social Media, I had a good feel for where she stood on Open Source (hello! Check out her role!) but I was pleasantly surprised to note that she is also a passionate advocate of Diversity.  She was one of the moderators of a discussion at this summit that focused on the vision of a world where the OpenStack community is truly and completely blind to meaningless differences in gender, color, creed and culture. Hello Diversity !! Checkout Nithya’s quote in the graphic displayed at the conference: “A Company’s Diversity can strengthen the core workforce” !!People like Nithya and Neela have diversity in their upbringing which is very likely to influence their thought processes. Diversity in representation across color, sex, gender and race within a community is a good first step.  But, there is a lot to be said about the diversity within us which represents our own true mindset.Real diversity comes from within.The OpenStack Summit had 7,500 attendees in 2016 compared to the 75 that it had in 2010.  The community has come a long way with representation from several countries around the world.  I heard so many different languages in the elevators and hallways that it did not quite feel like being in Austin, TX once you entered the Austin Convention Center.I am sure the OpenStack community has several individuals like Neela and Nithya from all parts of the world with diversity ingrained in their mindsets.Which is why it will grow. Because it is such individuals who continuously give shape and form to the culture of Open Source — one person at a time.Like somebody I know very well recently said: Culture and Technology can drive the future of OpenStack.Let the diverse minds prevail.What say you?last_img read more

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Why Secondhand Smoke May be Bad for Your Heart

first_imgScientists say they have confirmed a link between secondhand tobacco smoke and an increased risk of heart disease. The findings, reported in tomorrow’s issue of the British Medical Journal, also may clear up a mystery about why secondhand smoke appears to be such a potent risk factor for the condition.The mystery is that 20-cigarette-a-day smokers have a 78% increased risk of heart disease over the general population–a risk elevation that’s only three times that of passive smokers, even though active smokers inhale roughly 100 times as much smoke. Some have suggested that poor diet or some other factor might account for the high disease rate among smokers’ spouses, but the new study suggests that tobacco smoke alone is responsible for most of the effect.Malcolm Law and his colleagues at the Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine in London performed a statistical analysis of data drawn from 19 studies on the effects of passive smoking on heart-disease rates. Law says he had expected to disprove the implausibly high risk for heart disease from passive smoke. “We thought it must be that they ate a different diet or some kind of error in the studies,” he says. Instead, his group found that passive smoke caused about a 23% increased risk of heart disease, even when accounting for the small effects of differences in diet.To try to explain the elevated risk, Law’s group analyzed several studies of platelet aggregation, which showed that even a relatively small amount of smoke causes clotting factors in the blood to become significantly stickier. Based on a study showing the increase in heart-disease risk of different degrees of platelet aggregation, they showed that passive smoking causes enough aggregation to explain the heart disease risk. They suggest that the effect does not become worse with more smoke. Other changes in the blood that promote heart disease occur in a more gradual way with increasing smoke, say the authors, and those are responsible for the gradual increase in risk between one-cigarette and 20-cigarette-a-day smokers.The paper “represents the most thorough review of the evidence that’s yet come out,” says Richard Peto, an epidemiology professor at Oxford University. He says the authors “propose a strong case” to explain the heart-disease data, suggesting that “the risks are much higher than one would have thought.”last_img read more

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Zerhouni Returns to Johns Hopkins

first_imgElias Zerhouni, who stepped down as the U.S. National Institutes of Health director last October, is returning to his roots as a professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Zerhouni, a radiologist, was a dean at Hopkins before joining NIH in 2002. He told ScienceInsider that he plans to reestablish a research group in molecular imaging and stay at Hopkins “for the next year at least.” He’s also working as a senior fellow at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.last_img read more

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Big Fight Over Small Business Research

first_imgThe U.S. Congress is scrambling to reauthorize a $2 billion program that supports research by small high-tech businesses before it expires next month. And although all sides agree that start-up companies are an important engine in fostering innovation, there are some big disagreements about the program’s impact on academic research funding and the kinds of companies eligible for support. The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, which began in 1982, is funded by taxing the research budgets of 11 federal agencies. The current 2.5% set-aside would grow to 3.5% by 2020 under a bill (S.1233) passed last week by the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship. (The portion spent on a younger sibling that targets university start-ups, the Small Business Technology Transfer program, would grow from 0.3% to 0.6%.) The House version (H.R.2965) of the reauthorization, to be taken up on Wednesday by the science committee and possibly Thursday by the small business committee, provides for no such increase. That’s fine with the biomedical research community, which isn’t thrilled at the prospect of a bigger bite being taken out of federal support for basic research at the National Institutes of Health, which runs the second largest SBIR program after the Department of Defense. It’s also the position taken by the Obama Administration as outlined in a 2 June letter to Senator Mary Landrieu (D–LA), chair of the Senate panel. A last-minute change in the Senate bill, however, includes NIH in the expansion, possibly a reaction to a decision by Congress in February to exclude NIH’s $10 billion boost in the stimulus package from the SBIR set-aside. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Among legislators, the size of the set-aside isn’t the biggest bone of contention. The real battle is likely to be over how to ease a controversial restriction on participation by venture capital firms imposed by the Small Business Administration in 2002. That change blocked companies receiving a majority of their funding from venture capital firms from applying for grants on the grounds that the program was designed to help the proverbial entrepreneur in his garage, not a spinoff from some giant company or a gamble by deep-pocketed financiers. The biotech industry and NIH officials disagree. They say that the exclusion is counterproductive and has prevented the agency from funding those companies most likely to hit the jackpot. The House bill attempts to restore the status quo by lifting the restriction but adding a proviso that no single venture capital firm could hold a majority stake in a start-up. The Senate bill, in trying to strike a balance, would allow NIH to spend up to 18% of its money on grants to such firms, with other agencies limited to 8%. (The numbers are based on a 2006 report by the General Accounting Office that found 18% of NIH’s SBIR awards in 2001–-04 went to companies that had received money from venture capitalists. The DOD figure was 7%.) The White House waffles on the issue, telling Landrieu that small businesses “should not be crowded out of the program” but that it’s also important that “the most promising small companies are not arbitrarily restricted or excluded because of their capital structure.” A neutral party in the debate, the National Research Council of the National Academies, says in a new report out this month that the provision is trying to fix a problem that doesn’t exist. Its survey of companies that had received Phase II grants (up to $750,000 after a $100,000 proof-of-principle Phase I award) found that as few as 12%—and perhaps only 4%—of companies that rely on venture-capital funding received SBIR awards. (The study covered awards made from 1992 through 2002.) It argues for a return to the pre-2002 status quo, saying that “the impact of the ruling falls disproportionately on the most promising firms—those repeatedly selected by NIH for their promising technologies and venture investors for their commercial potential.” Both bills would raise the current guidelines on the size of the typical awards, now $100,000 for Phase I and $750,000 for Phase II, to keep up with inflation. The House is more generous, going up to $2 million for Phase II and $250,000 for Phase I. (The Senate levels are $1 million and $150,000, respectively.) The House would extend the program for 2 years, whereas the Senate’s bill runs until 2023. The clock is ticking on a compromise. The programs expire on 31 July, and although all sides say they want to finish work by then, it’s more likely that Congress will need to approve an extension into the fall so legislators can keep plugging away.last_img read more

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Biodiversity, Climate Change Studies Backed at Smithsonian

first_imgThe Smithsonian Institution, home to 500 scientists and an equal number of research fellows, today received a promise of a boost for the four grand challenges launched in its September 2009 strategic plan. Most notably, the total proposed budget of $797.6 million includes $10 million for the strategic plan. Of that, $8 million would go toward promoting biodiversity and climate change research. These funds signal increased recognition of the need to support programmatic activities at the Smithsonian and not just bricks and mortar, says Scott Miller, the Smithsonian’s deputy undersecretary for science. Within the $8 million, the Center for Tropical Forest Science, based in Panama, is slated to receive $2 million to expand its long-term studies of forest plots around the world. The center got $1.25 million last year, the only science program to be singled out for support in the Smithsonian’s 2010 budget. If another proposed $1 million in the new budget is approved, the Smithsonian will begin to set up a parallel long-term program in the sea by establishing marine “plots” in Panama, Florida, and Belize that will become long-term study sites. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Another $1 million will support DNA barcoding, a short-cut way to identify species. The proposed budget also includes $1 million for the Encyclopedia of Life project and $2 million for biodiversity research across the Smithsonian. As for bricks and mortar items, the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Maryland, hopes to be swapping out temporary labs based in trailers in a parking lot for new lab space if $16 million of the $40 million total cost is approved. And there’s $7 million for renovations at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. Overall, the proposed Smithsonian budget of $797.6 million is an increase from the FY 2010 budget of $761.4 million and includes $660.8 million for salaries and expenses and $136.8 for facilities.last_img read more

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Senate Climate Bill Saga Jerks Forward as Graham Wields Power

first_imgSenate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) today suggested that the stalled climate bill could move before the immigration package, potentially breaking a logjam with key sponsor Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC). From Business Week: “The energy bill is ready, we will move that more quickly than a bill we don’t have,” Reid told reporters today in Washington. “I don’t have an immigration bill.” Reid said he told Republican Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina last week that he wanted to proceed with climate- change legislation before taking up immigration. Graham, working on both issues, pulled out of talks to proceed with a global- warming bill on April 24 to protest that President Barack Obama and Senate leaders may act first on immigration laws. No word from Graham yet on whether he’ll revoke a promise made on Saturday to bolt a coalition he has formed with senators Joe Lieberman (ID-CT) and John Kerry (D-MA). The threesome has a bill considered more industry-friendly than the climate bill passed by the House of Representatives last year. Although the bill’s supporters say it would match the House version in cutting greenhouse gases 17% below 2005 levels by 2005, it would be less aggressive by covering only part of the economy at first and phasing utilities in later, while offering more financial support and flexibility to industry. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) The politics at work right now are complex, with Reid facing a tough election campaign at home where millions of Latino Nevadans could favor his immigration bill. Graham has much to lose if an immigration bill comes up and splits the GOP, because he favors Reid’s reforms and is already under fire at home for centrist positions. For him, climate may be less painful to pass than immigration – and it has a better chance of passage. Graham “likes to work in a bipartisan way so that he can be there to make deals, affect things,” said South Carolina state senator Paul Campbell, a Republican. “But I don’t know why he’s partnered with Kerry on this.”last_img read more

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Parties in Stem Cell Lawsuit Want to Keep University of California Out

first_imgToday, the two sides in the court battle over whether federally funded research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is legal both registered their opposition to the University of California’s (UC’s) request this week to become a party to the suit, the first university to do so.  In briefs submitted to the U.S. Court of Appeals to the D.C. Circuit, the plaintiffs, two researchers who study adult stem cells, argue that UC hasn’t justified why it should be allowed to join at this late stage, more than a year after the plaintiffs originally sued. The Justice Department, which is defending the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Department of Health and Human Services, says that although UC “has a valuable and significant perspective to offer,” making it a party to the case would invite more universities to weigh in and would slow the appeal down. Instead, Justice attorneys suggest that UC should submit an amicus (friend of the court) brief supporting the government’s position. Both sides say UC’s interests are adequately represented by the government. At 10 a.m. on Monday, 27 September, the appeals court will hear oral arguments about whether the court should issue a longer stay of a district court’s 23 August preliminary injunction that halted hESC research for more than 2 weeks. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)See our complete coverage of this issue.last_img read more

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Why French Scientists Find Joie de Vivre in the U.S.

first_imgPARIS—The brain drain of French scientists to the United States might not be huge, but America lures some of the country’s best researchers who may never come back, concludes a study carried out by the French think tank Institut Montaigne. The report, titled French Higher Education Expatriates in the United States, sets out 12 proposals to entice French researchers to return to the fold. These include a census of French scholars abroad and foreign researchers trained in France in order to build links with the diaspora, a strong communications campaign on job offers, and clear incentives for researchers to work in France. Only a few thousand French researchers work in the United States for the moment, but the number has accelerated recently and is “worrying,” says Ioanna Kohler, policy programs director at the French-American Foundation in New York City and author of the report. Between 1985 and 2008, 2745 French students pursued their doctorates in America and 70% stayed on. Researchers represented 27% of French expatriates in the United States in 1996-2006, against only 8% in 1971-1980, and a 2007 study showed that the United States was home to 40% of the best French biology and economics researchers. The reasons for buying a one-way ticket are more than the higher salaries available in the United States, although that is a major consideration, says Kohler, citing 83 interviews she conducted with French scientists who are now or once were in the United States Other advantages to America cited by these researches are better working conditions, fairer recruitment, a competitive spirit, and the ability to devote more time to research and less to teaching. On the downside, French researchers working in the United States are under greater pressure to produce, have to spend more time raising funds, find an “Americano-centrism” in the scientific culture and, for women, are deprived of a family life, Kohler says. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) To keep French researchers from leaving permanently, the report further recommends bringing more foreign scientists to France, increasing cooperation between French labs, boosting scientific exchanges with the rest of the world, and joint ventures between research agencies or universities in France and the United States. Although French expatriate researchers are interested in reform taking place in France, some of them have little contact with colleagues at home, Kohler also found. At the moment, she laments, “the absence of statistics on French scholars and researchers in the United States” is surprising-and such ignorance “maintains fears of a massive exodus of the French elite” across the Atlantic.last_img read more

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